Archive from April 2019

Happy 21st Birthday Matt Gill!

CONGRATULATIONS and CELEBRATIONS to our Senior Apprentice Matt Gill who is celebrating his 21st birthday. As 21 is still a ‘special’ birthday in the UK, Payara has given Matt a birthday gift and card and even some celebratory balloons for his desk. Matt brought in a tray of birthday cupcakes to share which were very appreciated.  We all wish Matt a very happy birthday and started to think what he can now do in the UK ‘legally’ which include ; 

Best Fuels for Developers

We all have our little aids that keep us ticking along, tapping that keyboard, making the magic runes do the things. This blog will make me sound very British, and may make you hungry, but here are my five best fuels that keep me making sarcastic comments and writing code when I start to lag on the long days:

Microservices for Java EE Developers

Nowadays, the concept of microservices is more than a simple novelty. With the advent of DevOps and the boom of container technologies and deployment automation tools, microservices are changing the way developers structure their applications. With this article, our intention is to illustrate that microservices are a valid option for Java/Jakarta EE developers and how Payara Micro is a robust platform to reach that goal. 

EE Security in Relation to JASPIC, JACC and LoginModules/Realms

Java EE 8 introduced a new API called the Java EE Security API (see JSR 375) or "EE Security" in short.

 

This new API, perhaps unsurprisingly given its name, deals with security in Java EE.  Security in Java EE is obviously not a new thing though, and in various ways it has been part of the platform since its inception.

 

So what is exactly the difference between EE Security and the existing security facilities in Java EE? In this article we'll take a look at that exact question.

 

Payara On Tour in Japan!

We are extremely excited to announce that we will be touring Japan in just a few short weeks. We have teamed up with some of the most prominent Java User Groups in the country and will be delivering a range of talks.

Career Fair at The Chase School

Recently I had an opportunity to take part in a career fair hosted by The Chase School. The school is adjacent to our office which has led to the development of a special relationship between the school and our company. We have taken students for work experience and apprenticeships over the past few years.  We are always looking for opportunities to find new talent locally, and the career fair provided exactly that. The fair was attended by students in year 11 - 13. This provided an excellent platform to promote our degree apprenticeship.

Payara Server管理コンソールの基礎 - #1 概要とコンセプト

これから数回にわたって、Payara Serverの管理コンソールの基本的な使い方について解説してゆきたいと思います。第1回目は、Payara Serverの管理コンソールの概要と、管理コンソールを使用する上で理解しておきたいPayara Serverのコンセプトについてご説明します。

Specs, RIs, APIs - What Does it all Mean?

There are many acronyms in the Java world. Here's a list of some commonly used acronyms and what they mean.

 

JCP - Java Community Process

The Java Community Process is simply the process by which Java EE was developed. It's an open process that anyone can apply to become a part of. To find out more about the JCP, visit their website: https://www.jcp.org

Behind the Scenes of Payara Server

You might already know that Payara Server originated out of a Glassfish fork. Glassfish being the reference implementation server of Java EE. Let's take a closer look at the components and modules that make up Payara Server.

HTTP/2 in Payara Platform 5

Payara Platform 5 brought with it an implementation of Servlet 4.0, which itself contains support for the HTTP/2 standard. HTTP/2 support in Java has been fairly obscure for JDK 8 users, causing issues for many depending on their JDK minor version. This blog hopes to clarify the state of HTTP/2 in Payara Platform 5.

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Apprenticeships

I started out as any other student doing A-levels, being force-fed the idea that to have any semblance of success in life I have to be looking at universities, which I partly believed. After passing my A-levels and planning to take a gap-year to mull over going to University, worrying about the £40,000+ debt once I finish, then the job hunt, where you are competing with hundreds (if not thousands) of starry-eyed graduates that have the same degree. What I quickly learned about the IT industry, however, is that a degree doesn't tell a employer how good you are at writing code, because in the industry, experience takes precedence.