Posts tagged Payara Server

Steve Millidge discusses Jakarta EE, the Eclipse Foundation & GlassFish's future on the WaterWorks Podcast

Our CEO and FounderSteve Millidge is a guest on the WaterWorks podcast, the technology discussion podcast run by journalist and authorJohn K. Waters

Waters is the editor in chief of theConverge360 news and information sites Application Development Trends(ADT Mag), Pure AI, and Futuretech360 - with his career also including writing books, including "The Everything Guide to Social Media," one of the first deep dives into this world-changing phenomenon, and "Blobitecture," an exploration of an architectural and industrial design trend enabled by computer software. He also co-scripted the documentary film "Silicon Valley: A 100 Year Renaissance," which aired on PBS.

Steve had a conversation over Zoom with John. Steve - in Malvern, England, after work - spoke to John - in his Silicon Valley office just before 9am. Their discussion was wide-ranging and insightful, covering everything from the future of Jakarta EE and how it will fare under Eclipse Foundation stewardship, to the specifics of Payara's journey and how we got our marine logo! It's a must listen for those interested in open source and Enterprise Java. 

Hide Passwords with Password Aliases in Payara Server

Introduction

When performing the configuration of the Payara Server for your application, you often need to supply a password. The password to connect to the database is a classic example, but there are many situations where you need to enter this kind of sensitive data.

With Payara Server, you have the option to hide this kind of sensitive data from the user, so that this information is much better secured.

Payara Platform Supports TLS 1.3 on JDK 8

Transport Layer Security (TLS) was introduced as a replacement for Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). TLS is a cryptographic protocol which provides secure communication between a client and a server. It also provides a mechanism by which information is not tampered with, falsified or read by anyone other than the intended receiver. TLS 1.3 was released in August 2018 to replace the widely used TLS 1.2. TLS 1.3 comes with stronger cryptographic algorithms and brings in major improvements in performance, security and privacy, which will be discussed in this blog.