Posts tagged Payara Micro

The Present and Future of Java at the GeeCon Conference 2019

Each year, there's one special Java conference for me. It's GeeCon in Prague because Prague is my home city where I work and live and where I know so many great people in the Java community. This year, I had the opportunity to be a part of GeeCon again as a speaker. As is true every year, GeeCon was well organized, with a lot of interesting international and local speakers and a huge crowd of passionate attendees. All of this made the conference exceptional and worth attending.

How to Run and Debug your Payara Micro Application with IntelliJ IDEA

If you want to run and debug your application from within an IDE using Payara Micro, you need to take different steps and use a different configuration then when you run the application with Payara Server. With Payara Micro, you can start the runtime from a jar file with no previous installation step. In this blog, I'll show you the steps to use IntelliJ IDEA with Payara Micro and how you can perform a hot reload of the application.

Rolling Application Upgrades with Payara Micro and Kubernetes

Introduction

Application updates are required as part of the normal maintenance process of your application lifecycle management. These updates should be as smooth as possible, and especially for a micro-services environment, performed with zero-downtime of your Payara Micro application. The Kubernetes Rolling Upgrades feature can help you with this.

Business Benefits of Using Kubernetes with Payara Micro

The term “Kubernetes” comes from the Greek “kubernan,” which means to steer or guide. You can think of Kubernetes like a pilot for apps that are stored and run together in containers and other forms of workload distribution software. The Greek “kubernan” was transformed over the years to relate to the term “Govern”, which is another helpful comparison when trying to understand the full capacity of Kubernetes.

 

What Is Kubernetes and How Does It Relate to Docker?

Kubernetes is most commonly used with Docker managed containers, although it doesn't strictly depend on it. Kubernetes defines a Container Runtime Interface (CRI) that container platforms must implement in order to be compatible. These implementations are colloquially known as "shims". This makes Kubernetes platform agnostic so that instead of Docker you're free to use other platforms with corresponding shims, such as CRI-O or KataContainers.