Posts tagged Jakarta EE

Jakarta EE 10: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Introduction to Jakarta EE Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Jakarta EE (formerly Java EE)  is a software development platform built on top of the Java Standard Edition, for creating modern applications of all types and sizes for the cloud or in-house. It has gone through a number of evolutions to its present Jakarta EE incarnation. The goal of this blog post is to answer commonly and frequently asked questions about Jakarta EE and enterprise Java software development in general. There are a number of old preconceived notions out there about the platform. This blog post seeks to shed light on a number of these notions within the context of the current platform. 

Payara Platform Deployment Issues? Try Switching Off XML Validation

During deployment of Jakarta EE applications to the Payara Server, all the xml files (e.g. web.xml, persinstence.xml) are verified against its schema.

Payara Platform includes all standard Jakarta EE schema, so there is typically no reason to download external schema to check against xml files. However, if the application uses external schema, in very rare cases, there may be an error during deployment. In this blog, I describe a quick fix to avoid this. 

What’s New in Jakarta REST 3.1 in Jakarta EE 10?

The Representational State Transfer or RESTful architecture is a stateless, HTTP based communication standard for modern applications. It was originally proposed by Dr. Roy Fielding in hisPhD thesis. It has, over the years, become the default, programming language-agnostic means of enabling machine-to-machine communication. An application written in the Django framework in Python can have REST resources that are consumed by another application written in Java with Jakarta EE. Similarly, a Jakarta EE application can create resources that can be consumed by a C# application.  

Use Jakarta EE Identity Store With Payara and RDBMS

In my previous blog post,here,I examined the JSR-375 specifications and their implementation by Jakarta EE and, more specifically, by the Payara Platform (Server and Micro).

I presented a brief overview of the JSR-375 specifications and their new features, focusing on the notion of Identity Store and illustrating, with a simple example, one of the most common use cases: the LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) based authentication and authorization process.

Why Jakarta EE is Better than the Competition

Jakarta EE is the most popular Java server-side framework, way ahead its alleged competitors such as Spring, Quarkus, Micronaut or Dropwizard. With the industry-wide adoption of microservices based architectures, its popularity is skyrocketing and, during these last years, it has become the preferred framework for professional software enterprise applications and services development in Java.

In this blog, I'll explain more about Jakarta EE from my perspective as a Senior Java software architect/developer and why Jakarta EE and its runtimes beat the competition, in my opinion!

Using Jakarta EE Identity Store With Payara

These days the world-wide open-source community celebrates the advent of Jakarta EE 10. It is then a good time to look at one of its most relevant and, at the same time, unknown parts: security!

In this blog, I'll give an introduction to Jakarta EE Security, and then explain how Payara Platform builds on Jakarta EE Security with built-in identity stores for RDBMS (Relational Database Management System) and LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol).

What's New in Jakarta EE 10?

Jakarta EE 10 will be released on September 22! It's almost here...

While the previous releases of Jakarta EE have been focussed on the much-feared namespace change and updating everything with support for Java 11, this is the first major release of Jakarta EE to start introducing new features for developers to use. I’ll cover some of them here.