Payara Services Joins MicroProfile Working Group

Payara is pleased to announce that we have joined the MicroProfile Working Group. This builds on our commitment to shaping and improving Enterprise Java for both microservices and monolithic architectures. 

The MicroProfile project was born as a community initiative to optimise Enterprise Java with a microservices standard platform. It joined theEclipse Foundation in 2017, an independent open source software association, with the goal of driving innovation with a vendor-neutral "incubation" environment.

The Eclipse Foundation's MicroProfile Working Group encourages collaboration between participants, working in short cycles to propose and gain approval for new common APIs and functionality - and in turn drawing on the knowledge of a wide variety of different vendors. As one of the contributors, Payara engineers will shape and drive the future of the MicroProfile specifications.

We talked to our Founder and CEO Steve Millidge to find out more about what this means. 

Creating a Kubernetes Operator in Java

Kubernetes is much more than a runtime platform for Docker containers. Through its API you can not only create custom clients, but you can also extend Kubernetes. Those custom Controllers are called Operators and work with application-specific custom resource definitions.

How to Use Eclipse Transformer to Convert a 3rd Party Library to the New Jakarta Namespace

Introduction

The release of Jakarta EE 9 breaks a tradition of Java Enterprise. A legal requirement of the Java EE code donation from Oracle to the Eclipse Foundation is the change of the namespace of javax to jakarta.


But the change of the package and XML namespace in Jakarta EE 9 is only the beginning. The change of the namespace allows for new development and functionality, but all frameworks and libraries using one of the Java Enterprise specifications also need to be adjusted to the new version.

The Payara Monthly Catch: December 2020

In December, the biggest news was Jakarta EE 9’s official release, completing the move to the jakarta namespace. This officially took place at the Eclipse Foundation Jakarta One Livestream, where our CEO Steve Millidge took part in the keynote speech (watch here) and presented as lead on the GlassFish project (video here). 

In other major release news, MicroProfile 4.0 was made available towards the end of the month, with the delayed release set to bring in new features including alignment with Jakarta EE 8. 

Payara has also enjoyed kick-starting healthy debate this month, with our CEO Steve Millidge proposing that Ahead of Time Compilation with GraalVM isn’t always all it’s cracked up to - and watching the comments roll in!  

We are hoping to continue to make bold statements and drive forward discussion in the Java and Jakarta EE community in 2021. 

If this sparks your interest, make sure you are following us on Twitter!

Improvements to Payara InSight in Payara Enterprise 5.21.1 Release

The Payara Enterprise Release 5.22.0 in October 2020 was the first Payara Enterprise release to include our fully integrated and greatly improved real-time monitoring and alerting solution called Payara InSight (formerly known as Payara Monitoring Console in Payara Community).

Then in the November 2020,release, we made improvements in how alerts are represented in the user interface, the display of widget content, and configuration options.

For December’s Payara Enterprise 5.21.1 (patch release), we’ve continued to make improvements that make Payara InSight easier to use. Updates include slight changes to the GUI for consistency and warning awareness, improvements in the flow of creating new pages, and improvements to the process of updating or changing a previously created Watch.

How to Develop Applications with Minimal Security Risks

When we develop software we don't expect to be hacked or compromised. We build great new software for the needs of our clients. The people that use our software expect that our systems are safe and data will not be compromised. To ensure that safety we need to take responsibility and develop our applications in such a way that we can meet these expectations. Since the situation is real that our application is hacked or compromised. In the guide below, we discuss 7 pointers that can help you develop applications with a minimal security risk.

Cloud Myth: Ahead of Time Compilation Will Save You Money

There is a lot of interest in the server-side Java community around using ahead of time (AOT) native compilation provided by Graal Substrate VM to drive down memory usage and cold start times of Java microservices. While these frameworks are technically interesting, the claim is if you spend time rewriting your Jakarta EE applications to utilise these new frameworks, then you will substantially reduce your cloud operational costs. First, by enabling the adoption of a serverless deployment model and second by reducing your containers' memory usage.