Posts tagged Payara Platform

Business Benefits of Using Kubernetes with Payara Micro

The term “Kubernetes” comes from the Greek “kubernan,” which means to steer or guide. You can think of Kubernetes like a pilot for apps that are stored and run together in containers and other forms of workload distribution software. The Greek “kubernan” was transformed over the years to relate to the term “Govern”, which is another helpful comparison when trying to understand the full capacity of Kubernetes.

 

Eclipse MicroProfile Fault Tolerance 2.0

On the surface, the changes between Fault Tolerance 1.1 and 2.0 are straightforward. The main new feature is allowing use of the @Asynchronous annotation on methods returning CompletionStage which allows for more elegant composition of asynchronous computation.

 

Tips for Building Cloud-Native Applications

An increasing number of organisations have moved, or are planning to move, to cloud-based hosting and are developing their applications to run in the cloud. However, once it's decided that your next application is going to run in the cloud, there are still a lot of architectural choices ahead of you. Besides obvious benefits like cost reduction, scalability and easier administration, cloud environments bring their own disadvantages and potential risks. In this blog, I'll share with you some tips on how to take care of the most important disadvantages and risks when you decide to build your applications for the cloud.

We will look at the various options for running your application:

Deploy Docker Containers On Azure

 

Several Cloud Providers have the possibility to run your Payara Platform Docker Images on their infrastructure. In this blog, I will describe to you how you can run your application on Microsoft Azure using a Docker Container. All the steps required to perform this are described using the Azure Portal (web-based application) and the Azure Command line.

MicroProfile in Action on Payara Japan Tour 2019

A lot of things were completely new for me last week: my first time in Japan, first time on a JUG tour, first time within the Japan Java community. And, it was my first time giving a talk which was translated by an interpreter. I also did live coding during my talk for the first time. It was even the first time I went to a Buddhist temple and a Sumo tournament. And all of it was a blast!

HK2: The Hundred Kilobyte Kernel

HK2 is a rather old dependency injection (DI) framework and is used as the core of Payara Server. Created in 2007 by Kohsuke Kawaguchi (who is also the creator of the Hudson project, now Jenkins) at Sun Microsystems, it followed JSR 330 closely, which was the JSR that introduced the @Inject, @Named and @Qualifier annotations, the very annotations which are also heavily used in CDI.