Posts from Ondrej Mihályi

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The Health Check Service In-Depth - Payara Server 5

This is an updated blog of the original which was published in May 2016

Payara Server provides the Health Check Service for automatic self-monitoring in order to detect future problems as soon as possible. When enabled, the Health Check Service periodically checks some low level metrics. Whenever it detects that a threshold is not met, it triggers alert notifications that allow to detect undesired behavior and predict possible failures. All of these automatic checks are very lightweight and run with a negligible impact on performance.

Payara Services at Oracle Code One 2019

This year marked the second edition of the Oracle Code One conference, which was formerly known as Java One. The conference is one of the most important Java conferences in the world and rightly so for many reasons! Which means that we at Payara couldn't miss being there. We were extraordinary busy at the conference, so we want to share with you a short summary of what happened, what it meant for Payara and for the whole Java community in general.

Tips for Building Cloud-Native Applications

An increasing number of organisations have moved, or are planning to move, to cloud-based hosting and are developing their applications to run in the cloud. However, once it's decided that your next application is going to run in the cloud, there are still a lot of architectural choices ahead of you. Besides obvious benefits like cost reduction, scalability and easier administration, cloud environments bring their own disadvantages and potential risks. In this blog, I'll share with you some tips on how to take care of the most important disadvantages and risks when you decide to build your applications for the cloud.

We will look at the various options for running your application:

MicroProfile in Action on Payara Japan Tour 2019

A lot of things were completely new for me last week: my first time in Japan, first time on a JUG tour, first time within the Japan Java community. And, it was my first time giving a talk which was translated by an interpreter. I also did live coding during my talk for the first time. It was even the first time I went to a Buddhist temple and a Sumo tournament. And all of it was a blast!

Java 11 Support in Payara Server Coming Soon

The world is moving in fast forward and the Java ecosystem is no exception. In 2017, the release of Java 9 disrupted the Java ecosystem with the introduction of Java modules. Soon after, the new six months Java release cycle caused another disruption, with three new Java major versions released since then. The Payara team have been working hard to keep up with this new, faster velocity. Although the latest Payara Server version 5.191 doesn’t run on Java 11 yet, we’re very close and can confidently say the next version of Payara Server will run on Java 11.

A Presentation about Payara Platform and MicroProfile in Warsaw

In November, my friend Milen Dyankov started it all by inviting me to come to Warsaw to give a talk at a local developer meetup (sponsored by Liferay, Milen's employer). After attending several big conferences during the year, coming to talk at a much smaller event sounded quite relaxing! Visiting Warsaw for the first time was also tempting so I agreed to attend.

 

Did You Know? Asynchronous REST Requests and Responses with Java EE and MicroProfile

Java EE 8 fully supports asynchronous handling of REST requests and responses, on both client and server side. This is useful to optimize throughput of an application or even when adopting reactive principles. MicroProfile type-safe REST client API also supports this concept to allow you to call REST services asynchronously with a much more straightforward way with plain Java interfaces.

Securing Payara Server and Payara Micro with a Supported JDK

As you probably already know, Oracle decided to stop providing public updates for Oracle Java Development Kit 8 (JDK 8) in January 2019. Public updates and security fixes will be provided by Oracle only for the latest version of Oracle JDK, for 6 months until the next new version. While personal users will still continue to get updates for Oracle JDK 8 until December 2020, commercial companies that plan to use it after January 2019 will either need to become Oracle customers or switch to a JDK 8 distribution supported by someone else to receive regular updates with critical and security fixes.